The Bat Wing Shawl – A free crochet pattern

This shawl was inspired by a group of crocheting friends of mine who wanted to bring attention to the declining numbers of bats all around North America. I’m in Austin Texas and my town is very fortunate to have a thriving bat population. For now.  But an estimated six million bats have died due to a fungus that causes white-nose syndrome. This die off has been called one of the worst wildlife declines of the century.  Once the fungus invades a cave, 90% of the bats living there die. The National Speleological Society tracks the disease, collects funds to support research, and explains what humans can do to slow the spread of the fungus. The devastation doesn’t get much attention and I hope we crafters can raise awareness. If you like this pattern, please consider sending in a donation to The National Speleogical Society.

Before going forward there is something you should know. This is a pattern I’ve had sitting around in some dusty computer files for over a year. I’m brushing it off and posting it even though its never been tested. I’m the only person who has made one. A few of my crafty friends have started the shawl, and they seem to like it just fine. But none have finished.

What does that mean? It means crocheter beware! It also means that by starting this pattern you are entering a solemn, unbreakable, pinkie-swear promise to let me know if you think you’ve spotted a mistake. I have started a ravelry thread here on the Roving Crafters’ discussion board for any comments, concerns, compliments, pics, etc. Please let me know how your shawl is going!


A Bat Wing Shawl 

A Roving Crafters’ Pattern, designed by Jenn Zeyen

The shawl is made in wedges, five of them. There are four side wedges, 2 for the left side and two for the right side, split by a center wedge.

  • Yarn Used : 5 skeins of Cascade Sateen in Color Number 5 (a sport weight acrylic yarn @ 300 yds per skein)
  • Hook : Size F
  • Gauge : 17 Hdc = 4 inches (before blocking)

Stitch Notes

 

 

The Set-up

Chain 128

Set Up Row 1: Hdc in 3rd Ch from hook, Hdc in each Ch to end (126 Hdc), Ch 2 & turn

Set Up Row 2: FpHdc around each Hdc to end (126 FpHdc), Ch 2 & turn

Make two side wedges, a center wedge, and then two more side wedges.

A Side Wedge

Row 1: Hdc2tog, *Ch1, skip next FpHdc, Hdc in next* repeat until 4 FpHdc spaces remain (60 Hdc), Ch 3 & turn

(The 3rd chain in the “Ch 3” will count later as a Ch 1 space.)

Row 2: *Hdc in Ch 1 space, Ch1* until 1 Ch 1 space remains, Hdc in that Ch 1 space, Hdc in the Hdc2tog (61 Hdc), Ch 2 & turn

Row 3: Hdc2tog using the 1st Hdc & the 1st Ch 1 space, *Ch 1, Hdc in next Ch 1 space* repeat until two Ch 1 spaces remain (57 Hdc), Ch 2 & turn

(Remember that 3rd chain in Row 1? It counts as one of the “two Ch 1 spaces” at the end of this row.)

Row 4: *Hdc in Ch 1 space, Ch1* until 1 Ch 1 space remains, Hdc in that Ch 1 space, Hdc in the Hdc2tog (58 Hdc), Ch 2 & turn

Repeat Rows 3 & 4 ten more times. Use the table below to keep track of the number of Hdc’s in each row.

Row 5 54 Hdc Row 9 48 Hdc Row 13 42 Hdc Row 17 36 Hdc Row 21 30 Hdc
Row 6 55 Hdc Row 10 49 Hdc Row 14 43 Hdc Row 18 37 Hdc Row 22 31 Hdc
Row 7 51 Hdc Row 11 45 Hdc Row 15 39 Hdc Row 19 33 Hdc Row 23 27 Hdc
Row 8 52 Hdc Row 12 46 Hdc Row 16 40 Hdc Row 20 34 Hdc Row 24 28 Hdc

Btw, here is how the shortened rows look. Each time you stop and turn, you leave a “step” behind.


Row 25: Hdc2tog using the 1st Hdc & the 1st Ch 1 space, Hdc in each stitch and space to the neck edge (100 Hdc), Ch 2 & turn

(Be sure to put 4 Hdc in each “step”.)

Row 26: FpHdc around each stitch to end (101 FpHdc), Ch 2 & turn

Row 27: (Hdc, Ch 1, Hdc) in 1st FpHdc, *Ch 1, skip next FpHdc, Hdc in next* repeat until 4 FpHdc remain (50 Hdc), Ch 3 & turn

Row 28: *Hdc in 1st Ch 1 space, Ch 1* until one Ch 1 space remains, work 2 Hdc in last Ch 1 space (50 Hdc), Ch 2 & turn

Row 29: (Hdc, Ch 1, Hdc) in 1st Hdc, *Ch 1, Hdc in next Ch 1 space* repeat until two Ch 1 spaces remain (49 Hdc), Ch 3 & turn

(Again, that 3rd chain in Row 27 counts as one of the “two Ch 1 spaces” at the end of this row.)

Row 30: *Hdc in 1st Ch 1 space, Ch 1* until one Ch 1 space remains, work 2 Hdc in last Ch 1 space (50 Hdc), Ch 2 & turn

Repeat Rows 29 & 30 ten more times. Use the table below to keep track of the number of Hdc’s in each row.

Row 31 48 Hdc Row 35 46 Hdc Row 39 44 Hdc Row 43 42 Hdc Row 47 40 Hdc
Row 32 48 Hdc Row 36 46 Hdc Row 40 44 Hdc Row 44 42 Hdc Row 48 40 Hdc
Row 33 47 Hdc Row 37 45 Hdc Row 41 43 Hdc Row 45 41 Hdc Row 49 39 Hdc
Row 34 47 Hdc Row 38 45 Hdc Row 42 43 Hdc Row 46 41 Hdc Row 50 39 Hdc

Row 51: 2 Hdc in 1st Hdc, Hdc in each stitch and space to the neck edge (126 Hdc), Ch 2 & turn

Row 52: FpHdc around every stitch (126 FpHdc), Ch 2 & turn.

One side wedge is now complete. Repeat Rows 1 – 52 to make a second side wedge.


Here is how the neck edge looks:


A Center Wedge

Row 1: Hdc2tog, *Ch1, skip next FpHdc, Hdc in next* repeat until 6 FpHdc spaces remain (59 Hdc), Ch 3 & turn

(By stopping with 6 spaces, this wedge has shorter rows. But it’s the same basic shape as what you did earlier.)

Row 2: *Hdc in Ch 1 space, Ch1* until 1 Ch 1 space remains, Hdc in that Ch 1 space, Hdc in the Hdc2tog (60 Hdc), Ch 2 & turn

Row 3: Hdc2tog using the 1st Hdc & the 1st Ch 1 space, *Ch 1, Hdc in next Ch 1 space* repeat until three Ch 1 spaces remain (55 Hdc), Ch 2 & turn

Row 4: *Hdc in Ch 1 space, Ch1* until 1 Ch 1 space remains, Hdc in that Ch 1 space, Hdc in the Hdc2tog (56 Hdc), Ch 2 & turn

Repeat Rows 3 & 4 ten more times. Use the table below to keep track of the number of Hdc’s in each row.

Row 5 51 Hdc Row 9 43 Hdc Row 13 35 Hdc Row 17 27 Hdc Row 21 19 Hdc
Row 6 52 Hdc Row 10 44 Hdc Row 14 36 Hdc Row 18 28 Hdc Row 22 20 Hdc
Row 7 47 Hdc Row 11 39 Hdc Row 15 31 Hdc Row 19 23 Hdc Row 23 15 Hdc
Row 8 48 Hdc Row 12 40 Hdc Row 16 32 Hdc Row 20 24 Hdc Row 24 16 Hdc

Row 25: Hdc2tog using the 1st Hdc & the 1st Ch 1 space, Hdc in each stitch and space to the neck edge (100 Hdc), Ch 2 & turn

 (Be sure to put 6 Hdc in each “step”.)

Row 26: FpHdc around each stitch to end (101 FpHdc), Ch 2 & turn

Row 27: (Hdc, Ch 1, Hdc) in 1st FpHdc, *Ch 1, skip next FpHdc, Hdc in next* repeat until 6 FpHdc remain (49 Hdc), Ch 3 & turn

Row 28: *Hdc in 1st Ch 1 space, Ch 1* until one Ch 1 space remains, work 2 Hdc in last Ch 1 space (49 Hdc), Ch 2 & turn

Row 29: (Hdc, Ch 1, Hdc) in 1st Hdc, *Ch 1, Hdc in next Ch 1 space* repeat until three Ch 1 spaces remain (47 Hdc), Ch 3 & turn

Row 30: *Hdc in 1st Ch 1 space, Ch 1* until one Ch 1 space remains, work 2 Hdc in last Ch 1 space (47 Hdc), Ch 2 & turn

Repeat Rows 29 & 30 ten more times. Use the table below to keep track of the number of Hdc’s in each row.

Row 31 45 Hdc Row 35 41 Hdc Row 39 37 Hdc Row 43 33 Hdc Row 47 29 Hdc
Row 32 45 Hdc Row 36 41 Hdc Row 40 37 Hdc Row 44 33 Hdc Row 48 29 Hdc
Row 33 43 Hdc Row 37 39 Hdc Row 41 35 Hdc Row 45 31 Hdc Row 49 27 Hdc
Row 34 43 Hdc Row 38 39 Hdc Row 42 35 Hdc Row 46 31 Hdc Row 50 27 Hdc

Row 51: 2 Hdc in 1st Hdc, Hdc in each stitch and space to the neck edge (126 Hdc), Ch 2 & turn

Row 52: FpHdc around every stitch (126 FpHdc), Ch 2 & turn.

The center wedge is finished. Make two more side wedges to complete the shawl.

This pattern is pretty special to me and I hope you like it. You can use the “Print & PDF” button at the bottom of this post to make a print-friendly version of the pattern.

Check out our growing collection of original, free patterns here. 

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13 thoughts on “The Bat Wing Shawl – A free crochet pattern

  1. Oh (((Jenn))),
    You are reading my mind, I know you are! Besides being an unfinished WIP, I really like this shawl. I was wondering if the previous post on front and back posts in Crochet might have supported this pattern? This finished shawl is unbelievably beautiful! ♡ ♡

    Liked by 2 people

  2. in reading over your pattern, it took me a little time to figure out that in row 25 when you stitch in each hdc and ch-1 space, it goes down the straight side and then along the stepped side. (i’m not sure where this could be included in the pattern.) also, i wanted to confirm that after row 25 there’s 12 steps to put 4hdcs in each step, is that correct? (which is the little note after row 25.)

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    1. Yes. If I understand what you are asking (lol), the answer is yes. In Row 25 you put a stitch in each stitch and space all the way back to the neck edge, including in every stair left behind by those short rows.

      HTH

      Like

      1. Thank you so much! I have much to do this year, and I haven’t posted in a couple of days…today is leaf raking day, maybe I will share that! Lol!! Hugs, Sandy

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    1. Aha! It was you!

      Thank you so very, very much. Both for the kind words and the support. The Bat Wing went over pretty big on Ravelry and I guess now I know why, lol.

      And of course I’ve been pouring over your lovely blog today. LOVE the mood blanket challenge. What a fantastic idea. I am sadly too incompetent at web page stuff to paste your link in our side bar. But…. that’s why we have Jess! lol. Jess will do it for me.

      Thanks again for the help.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you so much, and yes 911 people saw the post on my FB page, 37 liked it, and 1 share! That’s good! I love it, it is simply beautifully constructed and we have a lot of shawl fans of all ages and I am certain many a bat wing shawls will be made from your lovely detailed pattern. Thank you for sharing it with us! 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

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